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Got Junk?

Recently my mother-in-law brought over a box of things from my husband's closet; his child-hood closet; the closet in the bedroom that he lived in for 20+ years; the bedroom that still has posters up in it from his late teens. Apparently, she's trying to clean it out a little and thought we would like items that he hasn't used in about 10 years (and quite frankly didn't even remember he had).

I go to my parents' house and there are 2 guest-bedrooms, in a house I have never lived in. In fact, their last four or five houses I have never lived in. There is hardly a ‘closet full of my junk’, much less my own bedroom. Yet, it is still home. It's the same furniture - well at least the furniture that the movers haven't crushed beyond recognition - the same pictures - the same smell – but no, well at least not much, ‘junk’. My mom still finds things once in awhile to send home with me but it is nothing compared to what has now collected at my house of my husband's.

I have been in our house for five years and somehow my basement is starting to accumulate enough junk that we can officially wade through it. I think it's time to move! Then of course I would have to weed through everything, throw away things I know I will never use. What would I keep? What would I throw away? Do I really still need my "baby's" high chair? What in the world am I going to do with the box of scrap material from a quilt I started over ten years ago? I am glad I don't have to make those decisions right now... but I tell you it would be much easier for me, a brat, than it would be my husband!

What do you keep moving from place to place pointlessly unable to part with? What is the best way, the best place to part with 'extra baggage'? Do you find yourself in conflict with your spouse over what is a treasure versus junk?

1 comment:

  1. One of the biggest headaches of a military relocation was deciding how to meet the weight limit for the government move! We learned after several moves how to deal with the stresses of a weight limit (what to keep, what to give, what to throw). Installation consigment shops, give away stores for young enlisted and several other wonderful opportunities existed to "lighten the load". It became fun to find someone in need of our "stuff" or a neighbor who needed a new propane tank, etc. Still tough to do but certainly experience pays off.

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